New high-ratio premiums more detrimental than zero-down programs?

One broker believes clients now putting less than 10 per cent down will be more overleveraged than those who purchased with zero down.

New high-ratio premiums more detrimental than zero-down programs?
One broker believes clients now putting less than 10 per cent down will be more overleveraged than those who purchased with zero down.

“I have to agree with [the] statement that equity will be non-existent in home bought under the flex down programs,” Len Lane of Verico Brokers for Life wrote on MortgageBrokerNews.ca. “By the time a client borrows their 5 per cent and capitalizes the CMHC fee they will be at 103.85 per cent of financing; which, if memory serves me right, is even higher than when we had a true zero down program.”

Industry professionals raised the equity issues clients will face under the recently implemented premium changes at two of the largest mortgage default insurers.

“What is lost in the $5-per-month analogy is the erosion of a homebuyer's initial equity position brought by the higher premium,” Shaun Serafini of Dominion Lending Centres Mortgage Excellence wrote on MortgageBrokerNews.ca. “They are now getting less than 1.5 per cent equity in a home despite coming up with five per cent down payment (not a small feat in itself these days). This is almost a full percentage of equity loss from the last wave of premium increases.”

CMHC announced last Friday that effective June 1 insurance premiums for those who have less than a ten per cent down payment will rise 45 basis points to 3.6 per cent. The Crown Corporation said the move will only add about $5 per monthly payment.

This is the second increase in two years, as CMHC hiked its premiums from 2.75 per cent to 3.15 per cent in 2014.

Genworth followed suit Monday by increasing its mortgage default insurance premiums by 15 per cent for all homebuyers who put down less than ten per cent of a home’s purchase price.