by 18 Jun 2012

Therapists will tell you that after practicing any positive act for any period of time, it eventually becomes a part of you


(TheNicheReport) - If you haven't seen the movie, "All That Jazz," you should rent this movie from your local video store.  This is a movie that has, as a subtle yet integral message, a lesson that we all should learn.  The star of the movie, Roy Scheider, who plays the part of Bob Fosse, a Broadway director, choreographer and well-known raconteur, teaches the lesson.  Apparently Bob Fosse had a habit that became a part of his life, that we should make a part of ours.  The movie contains scenes where the lead actor uses two specific words constantly.  These two words teach us a principle that should be applied to our lives as mortgage representatives.  I promise you, it is a part of my life.


One of the basic principles taught by every motivational teacher since the idea of "secrets of sales success" was first thought of is to be upbeat and hide your personal and business problems.  Your clients, both potential and actual, don't want to listen to you whine, don't want to hear you complain, don't want to be brought down by your problems.  They want to do business with successful, upbeat and interesting people.  So – you must create that image, no matter what is going on in your life.  Your clients don't care to hear about the flat tire you had, the difficulty you're having with your children, mother, father, sister, brother, aunt, uncle, cousin.  They want you to help them be successful, and your responsibility is to be sure to get clients approved for their mortgage.  Those people who are best able to help others be successful exude the image of "Success."


While watching this movie, one activity that took place struck me as so very important that I have used it repeatedly.  This activity, a physical expression of a psychological event, showed that regardless of what was going on in Bob Fosse's life, no matter what outside influences might be affecting his life, he had to go "on stage."  He had to go "on stage" as an actor – as a dancer – lover – father – boss – promoter – loan officer. 


When he went "on stage" he was no longer the same person who had been in the wings of the theater stage.  In the wings, he was merely a man – a man who had so much evil chasing him trying to influence his life, evil that created more problems than he could count. But when he went "on stage" he had a part that he had to sell to the audience that evening.  He needed the audience to buy his act.  He wanted the audience to give him a standing ovation.  He waited for the "BRAVO" in order to take his bows.  He was a perfect actor.


Before he went on stage, he checked himself in the mirror, primped, pinched his cheeks, slicked his hair, checked his clothes, shoes and teeth, snapped his fingers and said "Show Time."  It was more than just a physical act; it was a way of putting his mind in a certain place, a place that was positive, free of problems, cares, and any influence from the devils in his mind. It helped create a mindset, clear his mind of any negatives and be ready to sell himself.  This is an action I’ve taken for the last 40 years, when going on a sales call.  I physically snap my fingers and say the words "Show Time" just before I get out of my car.


Mortgage representatives should make it a part of their routine especially when they go on a sales call. In fact, if you can discipline yourself enough, try the "Show Time" routine whenever you need to enter into any conversation.

Therapists will tell you that after practicing any positive act for any period of time, it eventually becomes a part of you.


Ralph LoVuolo, Sr

Ralph LoVuolo, Sr. President, Mortgage Motivator, a consulting firm on the cutting edge of the mortgage business to help people achieve their true potential. LoVuolo Sr. is one of the founding fathers and a two-term president of the New York Association of Mortgage Brokers. Additionally, he served as Parliamentarian for six years on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Mortgage Brokers. LoVuolo, Sr. can be reached at, or visit him at  




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