HUD announces $178.5 million in recovery grants for flood-hit areas

by Francis Monfort04 Aug 2017
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has allocated an additional $178.5 million of funding to support recovery in areas across several states hit hardest by severe flooding in 2015 and 2016, Secretary Ben Carson announced Tuesday.

“Clearly, there are hard-hit communities in these states that need more help to recover from the devastating floods they experienced over the past two years,” said Carson.  “Today, we make another investment in the future of these communities and to help our neighbors in need.”

The grants are provided through the department’s Community Development Block Grant – Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) Program.  Together with previously allocated grants, HUD’s investment to hard-hit areas now totals almost $946.7 million.

For 2016 disasters, HUD is releasing disaster recovery funds of $57.5 million for Florida, resulting in combined allocations to date of $117.9 million; $42.4 million to West Virginia, resulting in combined allocations of $149.9 million; $31.9 million to North Carolina, resulting in combined allocations of $236.5 million; $27.8 million to South Carolina, resulting in combined allocations of $95.1 million; and $9.8 million to Texas, for combined allocations to date of $238.9 million.

For 2015 disasters, Texas was granted an additional $8.2 million in disaster recovery funds for total combined allocations of $74.6 million. Disaster recovery funds of $978,000 were granted to San Marcos, Texas, resulting in combined allocations to date of $33.8 million.

According to the HUD, the grants support housing redevelopment, business assistance and infrastructure repair. The funds will be used by state and local governments to target the most impacted areas. HUD uses a statutory formula that measures unmet costs to repair seriously damaged properties and infrastructure to determine the allocations.


Related stories:
HUD earmarks $2bn for homeless programs
New HUD budget draft deals blow to affordable housing
 

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